Tailored Nutrition is the Future of Wellness

CP_Personalized_Nutrition_LeadBy Gretchen Lidicker

Expert nutritionist and health coach Jared Koch isn’t immune to the challenges, philosophies and endlessly conflicting research about what to eat, just like the rest of us. His impetus for becoming vegan years ago wasn’t just for ethical and environmental reasons. It was also because at the time so many scientific studies focused on negative health consequences of eating too much red meat and saturated fat. It was seemingly, increasingly evident to him that “healthy eating meant being vegan.”

He hoped that his life-long chronic digestive issues would dissipate and the energy boost that an all plant diet promised would one day kick in. “I felt and looked terrible,” says Jared Koch, the founder and CEO of Clean Plates. He had made what he believed was a therapeutic dietary change which should have, according to studies and research, destined to bring him total wellness. Instead, He got worse. Educated and thoughtful about these very issues, Jared did not approach his dietary change like a quick fix. He stuck to it. He was often sick, and the longer he maintained his new diet, the more fatigued he felt. Worst of all perhaps, his digestive issues persisted. This lasted almost three years.

Bio-individuality and the Art and Science of Personalized Nutrition

Jared instituted an overarching, new approach to his diet. Since humans are bio-individual, meaning that we each have unique nutritional needs to be healthy, there cannot be one single definition of what is a“healthy diet.” Differences in our anatomy, metabolism, body composition, cellular structure, and genetics — big and small — create varied nutritional needs, unique to you and only you. Personalized nutrition is the path by which you learn your bio-individual needs, empowering you with the knowledge, ability, and tools to make the best decision about how to eat for your body. This approach changed Jared’s life. It changed his clients lives. It can change yours too.

Jared listened to his own body. Really listened. He monitored many factors which contributed to his well being and he created his own food rules for himself, to great success and increased pleasure. This personalized nutrition program was and remains, no easy process, but it can be life changing.

Personalized nutrition, by definition, means tailoring and customizing food and much more in accordance with medical and biological metrics like blood pressure reduction or bmi. We, humans, are multifaceted, social beings with many differences, so his approach “… requires us to consider not just bio-individuality but also factors like budget, personal taste, cultural background, daily work schedules, and food access,” Jared said.

The barriers that exist between each individual and their ability to determine and maintain their unique healthy diet vary considerably by circumstance. It’s not only about what foods you eat and your body’s reaction. It’s also about what food you have access to.

As we work as a society to stop targeting and correct gross inequities in our food system, that grievously affect younger POC and lower-income folks disproportionately, each person has to start to define and act upon what is “healthy” for their body and their lives. Personalized nutrition mandates real time, real world solutions for you, by you, just as you are.

Your Individual Needs & The Food You Eat

According to the American Nutrition Association, Personalized nutrition is a way of eating that focuses on understanding that “… human individuality ( is what ) drive nutrition strategies that prevent, manage, and treat disease and optimize health.” This means not subscribing to any one food philosophy, whether it be the low-carb, high-fat ketogenic diet or the animal product-free vegan diet. Instead, you subscribe to only one food philosophy — the one you create for yourself based upon how you react and feel after eating.

This definition might conjure up images of advanced analyses or unaffordable nutrigenomic testing. But the truth is that personalized nutrition is pretty simple — and you’re probably already doing it to some degree in your own life. Everyday, you make decisions about what to eat and you may already notice how those decisions affect your body. The knowledge you gain from observing yourself and noticing what feels good to you is what personalized nutrition is really about.

“There is a basic misunderstanding about what healthy is,” said Dr. Marvin Singh, an integrative gastroenterologist. He regularly sees patients who are eating certain foods because of something they read or a story of a friend of a friend who had great success with a particular diet. “People fall into these traps of thinking they have to eat a certain way,” says Dr. Singh. But the truth is, “there are a lot of nuances to health and nutrition and if you don’t understand that, you’re not doing yourself a service,” he continues. One of Dr. Singh’s goals with his patients is to get them to start looking at it from an individual, clinical point of view. In other words, he practices personalized nutrition.

Creating Your Food Philosophy

Creating your own food philosophy is easier said than done. Polarizing and often extreme diet philosophies echo our weight-loss-obsessed and control-oriented diet culture. Judgement, condemnation and shame are still very much a part of diet discussions, and older, passe, themes still tend to creep into even the most modern, wellness-oriented ideologies in 2020.

Diets are therapies. When we pigeonhole ourselves into a specific way of eating without leaving room for personalization or customization, for tailoring the information out there to our unique and specific needs, it backfires. As Jared explains: “You not only miss out on healthy foods you’d enjoy eating, you become so focused on not ‘breaking’ your diet that your health slides down on the priority list.”

And it’s not just your health and well-being that slides to the bottom of the priority list, either. Enjoyment does too. As Loneke T. Blackman Carr, Ph.D., R.D., an assistant professor of community and public health nutrition at the University of Connecticut explains: “Food serves a purpose that is inclusive of nutrition but not exclusive of joy, family, and tradition.” If it’s 2020 and the idea that celebrating and enjoying food still brings us pause, it shows that we haven’t come quite as far as we want to believe.

Decreasing Food Confusion

Labeling foods either “healthy” or “not healthy” does not allow for nuances that are vital to personalized health. Think about it: Foods like red meat, grains, and saturated fat have developed such a stigma that their public image may never recover, even if the science redeems them. To add fuel to the fire, nutrition studies often report conflicting results. One day eggs are nature’s greatest superfood — and the next day they’ll give you heart disease.

As Dr. Carr explains: “There’s so much information and misinformation and it’s coming from so many different sources. I totally understand where that confusion comes from.” Many people are so paralyzed by conflicting nutrition information and dueling opinions that they have no idea what to eat. As a result, people who are motivated to make healthy lifestyle changes, but don’t know which route to take, struggle to find a sustainable way to do so.”

Nutrition research is perhaps the most vital piece of the academic knowledge, but applying it to you, a single person’s body is the necessity. For example, one study from Kings College in London showed that individuals have significantly different physiological responses — such as blood sugar spikes and increases in blood fat levels — after eating various kinds of foods.

“Diet is a very personalized thing; food sensitivities, microbiome issues, and genetics are all involved and really influences what you should eat,” says Dr. Singh. When it comes to our DNA, our genes can affect our nutritional needs in more than subtle ways. “Some people have a genetic mutation in a gene that puts them at a greater risk for hypertension and heart disease if they eat more than 1500 mg of salt per day.” According to Dr. Singh, people without that gene can have 2400 mg a day without negative health consequences. The same is true for Vitamin C, caffeine, and certain B vitamins. Our dietary needs exist on a genetic basis.

So while there are some food rules that apply to everyone — “Fruits and veggies above all, whole grains, lean proteins, and some healthy fats are foods that are good for everyone,” says Dr. Carr — some nutrition questions lead you to a dead end. For example, when it comes to the “Are eggs healthy or not” debate, “There might not actually be an answer,” says Dr. Carr.

It turns out that we’ve been asking the wrong questions entirely. Instead of debating which diet is the best and which is the worst, we should all individually be asking a single prevailing question: What foods are right for me?

At first, answering the questions “What foods are better for me, or worse for me?” might seem impossible. There’s still a lot society needs to learn about food and culture, behavior, and the science of nutrigenomics — the study of how food influences our DNA and vice versa.

Personalized Nutrition Is Already All Around Us

When you start asking yourself “What foods are better for me?” you’ll most likely find that you’ve already been answering it in bits and pieces for years. Do you avoid certain foods because they make you bloated, give you reflux, or make you feel tired? Do you continue to eat certain foods because they make you feel like a superhero? Do you eat a vegetarian diet but add in fish because it makes you feel so great? If the answer is yes to any of these, then there you go — you’re already your own nutrition expert.

Personalized nutrition is already all around us in some ways. Consider the supplement world. Supplements personalize our nutrients and should be therapeutic. As Nick Bitz, N.D., the Chief Scientific Officer at Youtheory® explains, “Dietary supplements are anything but one-size-fits-all. Supplements can and should be tailored to an individual’s unique needs. Otherwise, you’re treating the disease and not the person.

Clinicians don’t suggest the same supplement routine for every patient. In fact, even two patients with the same health condition might be prescribed an entirely different supplement routine. “Every botanical has unique energetic properties and the key is to choose the right botanical that not only targets a specific health goal but also brings balance to someone’s body-type. Not every remedy is appropriate for every person,” says Bitz. If you’re treating a health condition, it’s always wise to work with a professional to develop a supplement routine, but if you’re just looking to support overall health, companies like Care/Of, Rootine and Binto will provide you personalized vitamin packs based on factors like your health history, your age, and your gender.

The Elimination Diet: Your First and Most Important Diagnostic Tool

The elimination diet is the most foolproof personalized nutrition diagnostic tool at our disposal. With an elimination diet, you remove all common food allergens from your diet for a period of time, and then systematically add them back in, one by one, while tracking your symptoms in detail. This allows you to pinpoint your food sensitivities with a high degree of specificity. The elimination diet isn’t for the faint of heart; to do it right takes a few months and you must follow it exactly, or your results won’t be accurate. The good news is that it’s free to do, has no risks, and can be done anytime, anywhere. Often if you do it with the help of a trained professional, it’s fairly expensive.

For Jared, it was really the elimination diet that helped him finally ditch food labels, restrictive diets, and all-or-nothing eating plans. Plus, according to him, “an elimination diet isn’t as difficult as it sounds if you have the proper guidance and structure and you plan ahead.”

After his elimination diet phase, Jared found that he felt substantially better eating red meat and noticeably worse eating sugar, gluten-containing grains, and surprisingly, too many greens. So today, he makes his own food rules based on that personal knowledge and he’s never felt better. An elimination diet is a life-altering tool we all have at our disposal to change the way we eat and live.

Although, hopefully, personalized nutrition will one day involve nothing more than a single, quick test that tells us which foods are better for our unique bodies and which foods should be minimized or avoided to achieve optimal health, as of right now we don’t have that yet. Currently, outside of allergy testing, figuring out what works best requires us to be perpetual students of our own bodies. That is why the elimination diet has remained such a helpful diagnostic tool.

Make Your Own Food Rules and Modify as Your Life and Body Changes

After settling on an eating plan that feels right today, you will always be on the lookout for changes that you may need. Our nutritional requirements change throughout our lives. If you start training for a marathon or get pregnant, for example, you’ll need to adapt your diet to accommodate your new needs. “You may benefit from a diet for a while and then you need to switch it up,” says Dr. Singh.

Personalized nutrition is about listening to your body and always prioritizing how you feel over hard-and-fast rules, restrictive labels, and even the latest, splashiest headlines and studies. At the end of the day, you’re the only one living in your body. And when it comes to your personal nutrition journey, the best place to start is with honesty, patience, and compassion. Only then can you cultivate a way of eating that gives you the knowledge and tools to meet your body exactly where it’s at and undertake the journey into total food freedom.

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10 Small Wellness Tips that have a Big Impact on Your Health

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The idea of “living a healthy lifestyle” can feel overwhelming. What does that even mean? It’s easy to mentally equate health with strict diets and grueling hours of daily exercise. In reality, health is multifaceted and looks different for every person. There’s no need to be overly critical of yourself in your journey towards your own uniquely healthy lifestyle. Small changes to your lifestyle can have a huge positive impact not only on your overall health, but also in your daily exercise routine. Small steps are more sustainable and more likely to turn into healthy habits that ultimately stick. As personal trainer and fitness instructor Nina Saunders puts it, “Get a little uncomfortable in order to get comfortable.” Here are 10 small changes to try out in your daily routine that can have a big impact on your health.

1. Stand Up Alarm

Brianna Biffignani, professional dancer and certified fitness professional provides us with a timely tip: “Set an alarm on your phone to stand up at least once every 2 hours that you are working. Just standing up from your work space will increase overall health and make you more likely to walk around for a few minutes – even if it’s just a walk around your desk or office space. Maybe you’ll even incorporate a few stretches while you stand before getting back to work again.” 

2. Netflix Plank

Who else has been watching more Netflix than usual since quarantine? Gilmore Girls enthusiast Hit House Muay Thai instructor, yoga instructor (and Gilmore Girls enthusiast) Regina Postrekhina suggests that while binging on Netflix it’s a good idea to do a 1 minute plank between episodes. If you binge TV like us, you’ll end up doing at least three sets of these every evening. Still watching cable? “Plank during ads or commercials,” founder of The Ness, Aly Giampolo, suggests.  

3. Push Up Challenge 

Mike Pierce, Hit House instructor and fighter, has another quarantine suggestion. He shares, “Something I have been doing during quarantine is pushups every hour. It gives me a reason to get up from my desk and move each hour.” If that sounds like a big change, don’t sweat it: try incorporating one set of push ups once a day to start and build from there.

4. Rolling Not Scrolling

A lot of us reach for our phones first year in the morning to scroll through Instagram and look at the news. “Instead of scrolling through your phone, roll out your feet while drinking your coffee,” says Rowena Villanueva, founder of The Pilates Nook.

5. Airplane Mode

“Turn your phone on airplane mode by 10PM, and don’t turn it on until after you’ve taken your morning walk,” shares Cam Norsworthy, creator of Pilates service Cam On-Demand.

6. Serious Schedule

It’s easy to let the week slip by us and lose track of time. Sam Castro, Personal Trainer at Equinox, suggests taking a few minutes out of your day once a week to set up some plans. “Schedule your workouts for the week in advance so it can be a non-negotiable,” he says. 

7. Calf Raises 

Justin NG, founding instructor at Hit House and striking couch at NG Combat, provides us with a practical move to warm up your muscles. Waiting in line for something? Do some calf raises while you’re waiting!

8. Morning Dose of Protein

Marissa Graham, Professional Dancer, Certified Trainer at Dancers Who Lift (and virtual Hit House instructor) provides us with some insight to her morning routine, a simple healthy step: “Mix in a scoop of protein to your morning coffee. Caffeine plus hitting those macros… there’s no better feeling.” If you try this out, it’s recommended that you add a little milk or creamer to prevent your cup of joe from getting foamy. 

9. Back to… Boring Basic?

Co-Founder and CEO of Hit House, Tyler Scott, has some “straightforward” advice: “Prepare and eat the same meal for 7 consecutive days on the same hour. Keep it simple. Lots of protein with leafy vegetables.”

10. Bone Broth

Kara Rosella, professional stunt person, advocates for the power of bone both: “Add a cup of bone broth to your daily routine. It works wonders for digestion and skin!” She suggests investigating different bone broth powders available that are both easy to prepare at home and affordable (or try HealthKick partner Owl Venice for fresh Organic bone broth delivery!)

 

Emma Boelter graduated from Tulane University with a BA in English in 2017 and is currently pursuing her Masters in Clinical Mental Health Counseling. Although she has writing experience in many different areas, right now she is focusing on providing clients with high-quality digital material. She currently lives in New Orleans, LA.

Dana VanPamelen is the co-owner of Hit House, a Muay Thai Kickboxing studio in NYC. She has a Masters degree in Marketing from Hofstra University and loves gathering wellness life hacks.

Wellbeing Bingo Challenge!

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Join us for 3 weeks of Wellbeing Bingo! Our goal is to support each other and focus on making small healthy changes each day to help build long lasting habits. By taking care of ourselves, we can show up better for others!

We’d love to have you join us! Here’s our printable Bingo card, but if you don’t have a printer at home, you can keep up with us through Instagram instead — we’ll be sharing the card in our “Wellbeing Bingo” highlight (follow us at @my_healthkick), so you can screen capture the card and “fill it out” by putting GIFs or emojis over the squares you’ve completed and tagging  HealthKick partners you used!

Here’s how it works:

For the next three weeks of July, try to get at least one Bingo — that’s one completed row in any direction. For a little more of a challenge, try to fill out the entire card!

Details about each activity are included below with recommended HealthKick partners to use (you are entered to win $50 of HK credit for each HealthKick partner you use), but the real key to Wellbeing Bingo is to make it your own — we’re all just doing our best right now, and by making small changes daily we can make great progress towards our wellbeing goals!

Prizes:
  • For each HealthKick partner you use during the Wellbeing Bingo Challenge, you will be entered to win $50 of HealthKick Credit!
  • HealthKick will make a $100 donation on behalf of 3 winners to one of the non-profits below.
Each of the three winners will get to choose to donate $100 to either BEAM or Loveland Foundation to support the emotional and mental health of Black and marginalized communities.

How to Win:

If you’d like to play along for prizes, just take a picture of your card and submit on or before Sunday, 8/9 in one of two ways:

  1. Post a picture of your wellbeing bingo card on Instagram and “fill it out” by putting GIFs or emojis over the squares you’ve completed and tagging any HealthKick partners you used! Use the hashtag #wellbeingbingo and tag us at @my_healthkick
  2. Or email us your bingo card to concierge@health-kick.com with “Wellbeing Bingo Card” in the subject line

* You only have to choose one way of submitting your card!

Wellbeing Bingo Activities & HealthKick Partners to Try:

*Must be logged in to view HK partners

Schedule a Zoom Meeting with a co-worker: Keep connections strong even if you can’t run out for a coffee together. Pick a point in the day that works best, whether it’s a mid-morning break or a coffee over lunch!

Write down 5 things you’re grateful for: By practicing awareness of the positive things in life, we fight off our tendency to spot the negatives. As a result, we train our brains to be more positive!

  • HealthKick partners to try: Check out a brand new partner, Aura Health for 7 days free and try their gratitude journal!

Do an at-home manicure: You can create a salon-like feeling in your home to make self-care work in your life, wherever you are.

  • HealthKick partners to try: sundays (Get 20% off any of their products online for a limited time or try this quick and easy buff mani at home for guys and girls!)

Try a yoga class: No matter which type of yoga you choose, it’s a great way to stretch and strengthen your body, focus your mind, and relax your spirit.

Make a healthy meal at home: When you eat well, you feel well! Take a break from ordering in and make a nutritious meal for yourself or your family.

Take a bath: Taking a bath can help reduce pain and calm your nervous system, reducing the levels of stress and anxiety in you body and boosting your mood!

Participate in anti-racism education: Continue to learn how to be an ally in the fight against racial injustice. 

Do an activity to support your mental health: Try incorporating regular meditations into your daily life or try an online course to support your mental health.

  • HealthKick partners to try: Try a 5-minute guided meditation: Calm, Aura Health, Insight Timer, Caravan Wellness.
  • HealthKick partner to try: Join The Well for their Online Webinar Course: Reemerge. This 3-part course will make returning to work and adjusting to the new normal post COVID-19 quarantine easier. Learn practices that relieve stress, strengthen immunity and reconnect you with your internal wisdom and wholeness, bringing a more resilient you out into the world that may be unfamiliar to us. 

Eat 2-3 servings of fruits or vegetables: Skip the processed foods and snack on fresh fruits & vegetables to boost your immune system and get all the nutrients vital for the health and maintenance of your body!

Try a stretch session: Spending the day hunched over a desk (or a couch-desk) isn’t ideal for your posture or flexibility. Counteract this by stretching for at least 5 minutes.

Do an outdoor activity: Even just walking for 30 minutes in a natural or urban environment is linked with reducing stress hormone levels and improving mood.

  • HealthKick partners to try: Aaptiv (for a running guide)

Eat lunch away from your computer: Boost your energy levels and focus by getting up and actually enjoying your lunch break, multitasking isn’t always best!

Support a Black owned business: Diversify where you spend your money and continue to make an impact by supporting Black owned businesses.

Create a budget for the week: If you’re trying to save money, budgeting is a great first step!

Swap one item in your grooming routine for a clean product: Swap the products that you use daily first (remember small steps), like your cleanser, moisturizer or deodorant!

Go meatless for a day: Eating less meat is better for your budget, the environment and your health.

Try a breathwork session: The benefits of breathwork include reducing stress, to reducing inflammation, and alkalizing your blood PH levels. 

Register to Vote: The more of us who vote, the stronger our decisions as a people. Let’s make our voices heard!

Put on sunscreen: Using sunscreen daily, even when it is cloudy or raining, dramatically decreases your risk of developing skin cancer along with anti-aging benefits!

Do a HIIT workout: This type of training gets and keeps your heart rate up and burns more fat in less time.

Try a Pilates class: In addition to building a strong core, Pilates exercises are also designed to improve posture and correct imbalances in the body. 

Do an at-home facial: The experience of an at-home facial or mask is comforting and is another opportunity for mindfulness, the anticipation of a relaxing evening will give you something to look forward to!

Meal plan for the week: Using a weekly meal plan is the best way to cook healthier for yourself/family, save money, and time! 

  • HealthKick partner to try: PlateJoy (10 day free trial)

Pay it forward with a random act of kindness: Don’t underestimate the value of being kind to others. One small act of kindness can release a chain of positive events!

Get 8 hours of sleep: Getting enough sleep can improve your mood, memory, and immune system!

 

 

One-On-One with Lucas Krump: Co-Founder & CEO of EVRYMAN

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  1. What motivated you to start EVRYMAN?

For years during my own emotional health journey, I could have used the principles and tools that our co-founder Owen Marcus developed over the last 40 years, but I didn’t know they existed. I also would have benefited much sooner from the support of other guys in the process, but I didn’t know how or where to find them. EVRYMAN’s commitment is to provide access to both the tools and the other guys, essentially.

We each bring deep and unique experience in education, business, men’s health and wilderness therapy (Dan Doty, Owen Marcus, Lucas Krump and Sascha Lewis). We saw the need for something that is between primal emotional expression that can be hard to translate into everyday life, and medical therapy.  It’s both a science-based curriculum with “how” and “why” to express and act on emotions, and a daily practice to create and strengthen more authentic relationships.

2. What does wellness mean to you?

I appreciate your asking what it means for me. Part of our ethos at EVRYMAN is that we don’t prescribe a certain way of being. Every man decides for himself. For me, wellness is balance. It’s not a hardcore regimen of nutrition, meditation, working out and bio-hacking to some optimal level of performance. It’s making sure that I am doing something everyday, big or small,  to care for my mind, body and spirit. That could be a hike or a workout or taking time to slow down and connect with my fiancée, or calling my mom. For me, wellness is consciousness, knowing that we have the agency to change our state and our behavior, and in doing so, improve our wellbeing.

3. Do you feel like the wellness industry has made space for men to participate? Why or why not?

I don’t. I think the wellness industry has perpetuated goals that for many men and women aren’t really supportive of the word “wellness” as we just agreed is different for everyone. For men, the message is generally around bio-hacking and optimal performance. There is a competitive undertone that says, if you don’t look this way, do this, believe this, eat that, then you’re not well or manly enough. That message drives self-judgment and competitiveness among men that is lonely and hurtful.

Wellness should be an individual journey where you are accountable to yourself, not a spreadsheet of your reps, for finding that balance and your own best results as you define them. I believe that more guys would find meaning in “wellness” if the industry were more inclusive and accepting of everyone wherever they may be on their personal journey.

4. What are the biggest benefits of community, especially for men?

Humans are social mammals, we’re hard wired to connect. You can see in all the Zoom groups and parties today at a safe distance, how strong that hard wiring is. However, if you think of human connection as a nutrient, it doesn’t take, isn’t absorbed, unless we allow ourselves to be vulnerable enough to receive it. As men we’ve been conditioned to believe we should do it alone, to not ask for help– and beyond that, we are taught to disconnect from our emotions, to “suck it up,” “act as if,” and all that. The result is, we’re isolated, alone, and not set up to receive the nutrient of connection.

When men can join a community and be open and see other men like themselves open up, it’s freeing and more empowering. And to be part of a nonjudgmental community supports our mental, physical and emotional health, which are all connected.

5. What do you think we can do to help fight the stigma around mental and emotional health for men?

Stop calling it mental health in the sense of you’re either mentally healthy or mentally ill. Stop telling guys that traditional one-on-one therapy is the one answer. Of course, I support therapy for guys who need it. I’ve been in therapy myself. Unfortunately, in a lot of male circles, any kind of “emotional” or “mental” program or therapy is perceived as a weakness, that you are ill, that something is “wrong with you.” Guys hear that and are put off, and continue to suffer in silence, which probably means that others around them are experiencing pain as well.

There is also the reality that formal therapy is costly, can be hard to access, is something that guys don’t want to discuss with others, and there’s a stigma around admitting it. That stigma goes back to the idea that if you feel the need to talk about or express anything emotional, you’re not a normal guy. That’s just not true, and that’s the assumption that we need to keep calling out.

The stigma also comes from an assumption that everything that’s not as physical as flu or cancer is woo-woo. If you believe that, you ignore the real connections between physical, mental, and emotional health. We need to change that and it’s a big part of Evryman. We acknowledge those connections and help guys become well, healthy, confident, and secure within their own definitions of those terms, and of their manhood, across how they feel, think, behave, interact, and make decisions. Those are the building blocks of a good life, and every guy deserves to feel that way.

6. Are there any mindfulness or recovery practices that you incorporate in your routine?

I wake up between 6:00-7:00 and I spend 5-10 mins just being. I check in with my fiancée and take a few breaths. I also practice intermittent fasting, so I start my day with water and black coffee. I take cold showers daily, meditate a few times a week, and my biggest routine is my weekly EVRYMAN groups. We call our practice “CrossFit for your emotions.” Each week I connect with my group and practice expanding my emotional capacity, receiving the nutrient of community, if you will, while connecting with other men.

7. What wellness brands or studios do you use/attend on a regular basis?

I love Insight Timer for meditations. When I lived in the city, Modo Yoga was my go-to yoga spot and Calm has featured us on their app. There are so many great brands and companies innovating in the wellness space.

 

Check out our exclusive discount with EVRYMAN on the HealthKick platform to get involved with the community!