Healthy Thanksgiving Recipes

With Thanksgiving right around the corner we’ve rounded up a few of our favorite delicious and healthy recipes from our HealthKick partners, for all your Thanksgiving celebrations! 

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5 Tips For Mindful Eating

These days, our kitchen, office, bedroom, relaxation area, and workout studio are all under the same roof. For many of us, it’s challenging to create boundaries within each area, and for many, even more difficult to foster a place for mindful eating within our new normal.

As a celebrity wellness chef and nutrition coach, I’ve helped many clients tap into the practice of mindful eating over the years. This has helped clients keep energy up, hormones balanced, their mind clear, and their soul happy.

During this time with so much change and unknown, adapting to positive habits and conscious eating can help create a sense of calm and centeredness. Here are five ways to practice mindful eating.

1. Set The Foundation

Mindful eating starts with the food you keep in your house. Before you do your shopping for the week, think of your goals, how you want to feel, and who you want to be that week. 

Furthermore, keep the following formula to mind when shopping and building each meal: Think protein, fiber, and fat.

I recommend keeping high-quality protein options like wild and grass fed meats, above ground vegetables (fiber), like broccoli, cabbage, brussels sprouts, lettuces, cauliflower, and lastly, fat like avocado, olive oil, and nuts in the house.

Additionally, the less packaged foods the better — this pushes you to cook and create dishes to keep on hand, which connects you to the food you’re eating. Keep it simple and dedicate a little time to baking veggies and protein so you’re never in a mind. If you’re short on time you can also make eggs, and/or purchase a rotisserie chicken. 

2. Eat Smart, Not less

This brings us to the next tip. The aforementioned three-part formula of protein, fiber, and fat will help to keep you full, satiated and energized between meals. The best part? You can eat until you’re satisfied and not worry about counting a thing.

This naturally fosters a sense of mindfulness as you’re relying on your own measurement of hunger.

3. Change it up, but eat what you love

If you’re dining out, going food shopping, or ordering in, think of the foods you’ve been eating and how you can provide your body with new information. If you’ve been eating a lot of chicken, change it up to beef, or turkey. 

Before ordering off a menu, tap into what you’re craving before you go looking. Think of what you’d like to have and find that item or something similar on the menu. 

On the topic of eating what you love… this is where you can get creative.

If you’re craving italian, get creative by sauteing vegetables and a protein in a red sauce like Rao’s Marinara. 

If you’re craving Indian, use a pre-mixed spice blend like Garam Masala or Curry and create a dish using your favorite vegetables, protein, and coconut milk.

But there’s an exception! Sometimes you’re really just craving something familiar and something you love. 

The other day I really wanted a grilled cheese, and instead of ordering the gluten free version on bread that I knew wouldn’t do it for me, I ordered it on crunchy sourdough and went for it to the fullest. I was so happy and content and later switched back to the three-part formula and went heavy on the vegetables. My body was craving it by that point and I was able to listen to it because I listened to it earlier before.

4. Be intentional

If you’re craving something really indulgent, tap into the feeling and decide if you’re really truly craving that item, or if it’s the sensation you’re craving from a self-soothing standpoint. For example, if you’re craving a crunch and want to reach for the bag of chips, this typically stems from anxious energy. Eating crunchy items like carrots, celery, or swapping tradition chips for grain-free chips like Siete can help give you that same sensation while keeping you feeling great. From a physical standpoint, going for a walk, run, listening to music, and weight lifting can help move that anxiousness out of you.

If you’re craving foods that require scooping and sucking like ice cream, cereal, or a glass of wine, this typically comes from the primal sensation of sucking which gives us a sense of comfort, love, and nourishment. Try mimicking that sensation by having coconut yogurt, chia pudding, or sipping tea. For the physical swap, take a bath, spend time with a loved one, or journal to foster your deep need of connection to self and others.

5. Let go of perfection

There’s so much information out there on eating, working out, biohacking, and wellness. The science is constantly changing and we are fed (pun intended) conflicting information through ads on television, our phones, influencers, and friends and family. Sure, information is power, but sometimes all the information gets confusing and difficult to sift through, and ultimately our decisions around food and living have to come from deep inside our soul. 

Mindful eating is like strengthening your intuition, and the more you use it, the more you trust it. Trust your judgment, trust your body, and be true to what you’re needing and craving because your body ultimately has all the answers. 

Written by HealthKick partner

Shauna Faulisi, celebrity wellness chef & nutrition coach

5 Ways to Support Your Mental Health & Wellbeing

It’s important to care for your mental health and wellbeing on a daily basis. Below are five easy things you can do to enhance your mental health and wellbeing.

Build relationships with others – Relationships and social connections impact our mental and emotional health. Strong social connections are key to happiness.  Strengthen existing relationships by spending time with family and friends and work to develop new relationships by getting involved in community activities, group classes or by volunteering for a worthy cause.

HealthKick Partners to try: Evryman, Our Breath Collective, Yoga International

Establish Healthy Sleep Habits – Quality sleep is critical to good health. Sleep is essential for repairing the body, and it also helps maintain cognitive skills, including attention, learning, memory, and emotional regulation.  Inadequate and interrupted sleep also increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity.  Adopt healthy sleep habits such as establishing a regular sleep schedule and reducing caffeine intake and explore options such as meditation to wind down at night.

HealthKick Partners to try: Oura Ring, Insight Timer, Rootcha

Stay Physically Active – Exercising 3-5 times per week for 30-60 minutes provides mental health benefits in addition to the obvious physical benefits. Exercise helps reduce stress, I increase confidence and self-esteem, improve concentration, and it helps you sleep better too..

 HealthKick Partners to try: FitReserve, Barry’s, Aaptiv, Alo Moves

Eat a Healthy Diet – Brain health and mood regulation are impacted by what you eat. Make sure your diet includes foods rich in omega-3’s, fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fermented foods. Just as important, limit your intake of processed fatty foods, salt, sugar, caffeine, and alcohol.

HealthKick Partners to try: Sun Basket, Everipe, Thrive Market

Adopt Strategies to Manage Stress – Meditation, breathwork and mindfulness are examples of techniques that help individuals achieve a relaxed state of mind, and are great tools to have when you are experiencing heightened stress or anxiety.  Try out some different techniques and find one that works for you.It can be as easy as a five minute guided meditation or taking 5 deep breaths throughout your day.

HealthKick Partners to try: Calm, Aura Health, The Well, Talkspace

We hope you find these tips helpful. Taking care of your mind, body and soul on a daily basis will help you boost your health and happiness! 

Vitamins & Nutrients for Optimal Health

In honor of National Women’s Health and Fitness Day, we have collaborated with HK partner Binto, to highlight vitamins and nutrients that are particularly important to maintaining good health. Find out more about how these vitamins impact different body systems and functions.

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 plays an important role in blood production, nerve function and cell production.  It is an essential water-soluble vitamin found in foods such as poultry, meat, fish and dairy.  B12 supplements are also available.

Benefits: 

  • Helps the body produce healthy red blood cells (when B12 levels are too low, the production of red blood cells is altered, causing megaloblastic anemia)
  • Plays a role in nerve function and the production of DNA
  • May improve mood and symptoms of depression − Vitamin B12 is needed for the production of serotonin, a chemical responsible for regulating mood 
  • Plays a role in cell production, so adequate levels are needed to produce healthy hair, skin and nails

Magnesium

Magnesium plays a vital role in a number of bodily functions, including energy production, immune function, and cell communication.  It also helps maintain healthy bones. Magnesium can be found in leafy green vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, fish, meat, and dairy  products.

Benefits:

  • Plays a critical role in brain function and mood – low levels have been linked to an increased risk of depression
  • Contributes to increased bone density and helps prevent the onset of osteoporosis 
  • Has been shown to enhance exercise performance by aiding in the disposal of lactic acid, thereby easing muscle cramps and reducing inflammation
  • Helps balance hormones

Vitamin D

Vitamin D is critical for bone and cardiovascular health.  It also supports lung function and plays a role in mental health and cognition. Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin present in fish oil, egg yolks, butter, and fortified foods such as milk and yogurt. Our bodies also produce Vitamin D when our skin is exposed to the UV rays in sunlight. 

Benefits:

  • Promotes the absorption of calcium, which is critical to growing and maintaining healthy bones (low levels of calcium increase the risk of osteoporosis and fractures) 
  • Reduces blood vessel inflammation, and can help moderate blood pressure 
  • Activates receptors in the brain related to the regulation of behavior 
  • Helps you take in more oxygen when you breathe and reduces the likelihood of  conditions that negatively affect respiration
DHA Omega-3

Omega-3s are a family of essential fatty acids that play an important role in brain, and bone health. As the human body cannot produce Omega-3s, we must get them from foods, such as fish, nuts,seeds , or from supplements. 

Benefits:

  • Improves ability to think, remember and recall information by protecting against the loss of brain plasticity
  • Improves bone strength by boosting the amount of calcium in your bones.

These are just a few important vitamins and nutrients that should be part of your diet. If you aren’t sure where to start, check out Binto. It’s a great resource for women who are interested in personalized healthcare, with the convenience of a monthly subscription and access to licensed health experts. Take their quiz to tell them about your unique health needs and they’ll match you with the right supplement routine for you and connect you with a licensed provider.